From the Desk of Canon Olivier Meney, ICRSS

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The 7 Steps of Ordination

Part V:   The Ordination of Priests,  continued

After the laying on of hands and the consecratory preface, the Bishop vests the newly ordained priest in the vestments of the priesthood.  At the beginning of the ceremony, the candidate wears the stole over the left shoulder (as do all other deacons).  The Bishop places the stole around the right shoulder and crosses it in front.  The crossed stole symbolizes the state of obedience of the priest under the bishop.  The priest then receives the chasuble, with the back of the vestment folded, while the bishop says, “Take the vestment of the priesthood which signifies Continue reading

From the Desk of Canon Olivier Meney, ICRSS

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Abbe Ryan Post 4th Year Seminarian for the ICRSS

The 7 Steps of Ordination  Part IV:  The Diaconate

In the first three parts of this series, we have seen the progression of the cleric through the minor orders up to the first of the major, or “sacred orders,” the sub-diaconate.  The diaconate carries with it new graces and privileges in the service of God and Holy Mother Church.  The deacon receives the Book of the Gospels during his ordination and thus the power to read or chant the Holy Gospel for “the living and the dead.”  Other than the teaching function of the Scriptures, the very act of proclaiming the Gospel is considered an act of worship in the Mass.  Whereas a lower cleric can substitute for the sub-deacon and read the prophecies or the epistle, no lower cleric may substitute for the deacon in reading the Gospel.  Along with proclaiming the Gospel, the deacon also receives for the first time the right to preach in the Church.

The deacon aids the priest at the altar by preparing the Continue reading

From the Desk of Canon Olivier Meney, ICRSS

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The 7 Steps of Ordination Part III

The Sub-diaconate

                   In the first two parts of this series, we have seen how the Church disposes her seminarians for the grace of the holy priesthood through the reception of four minor orders: that is, the orders of porter, lector, exorcist, and acolyte.  Now we will turn our attention to the major or sacred orders.

In the ordination of acolytes, there is already a foretaste of the major orders, since the acolyte, by his function, is designated to assist the sacred ministers in the liturgical functions of the holy sacrifice of the Mass.  However, the sub-deacon is given an even greater role.  As his name suggests, he is the servant of the deacon at the altar.  This aspect of the sub-diaconate is represented by the manner in which the sub-deacon presents the chalice and the cruets at the offertory.  The deacon pours the wine into the chalice and the sub-deacon pours the water.  Also, while the deacon chants the holy Gospel, it is the sub-deacon who holds the book for him.  Furthermore, during the Mass the sub-deacon never sits nor covers his head while the deacon fulfills his liturgical functions.

The sub-deacon chants the books of the prophets and the epistles, which are preparations for the highest doctrine of the Gospel.  This is one reason why the sub-deacon holds the paten with the humeral veil before his face during the Canon.  He represents the Old Testament, in which the fullness of Christ’s glory was still veiled and no one could look upon the face of God and live (e.g. Exodus 33:12-22).

The sub-deacon is thus the servant of the servants of God (the word deacon in Greek means “servant”).  In this, he ought to imitate the humility of Our Lord Jesus Christ, who said to his apostles: “I am in the midst of you as one who serves” (St Luke 22:27).

The Church calls upon the sub-deacon to unite the virtue of humility to a perfect chastity.  Before his ordination, the Bishop warns him that, whereas before he had been free to leave the clerical state, now he will make a permanent commitment to clerical celibacy.  He also takes on the obligation of reciting the entire office.  The prayer of the office both glorifies God and gives the sub-deacon the graces necessary to fulfill his sacred duties.

Here at St. Margaret Mary’s Church, we have our own sub-deacon, Abbé Kevin, who fulfills beautifully this role of servant of the servants of God.  Let’s keep him in our prayers and thank God for the grace of his vocation among us!

Abbe Ryan Post, 4th Year Seminarian for the ICRSS

 

 

 

From the Desk of Canon Olivier Meney, ICRSS

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The 7 Steps of Ordination: Part II

 Exorcist and Acolyte

              As read in Part I, the six Minor and Major Orders, are training and preparations for the fulfillment of the great responsibility of assuming the Order of Melchisedech. The Porter assumes the care of keeping the grounds of the church safe before becoming the guardian of its most precious treasure, the Holy Eucharist. The Lector learned to familiarize himself with Holy Scripture before preaching them.

The third minor order, Exorcist, gives a real participation to the young apprentice of the power given to the priest to chase the devil. Every priest deals daily with Continue reading

From the Desk of Canon Olivier Meney, ICRSS

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The Leonine Prayers

These prayers after Low Mass which were prescribed by Pope Leo XIII who composed the Prayer to Saint Michael the Archangel, and were reinforced by Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII to pray for the conversion of Russia.

Tradition relates that Pope Leo XIII had a vision that took place in 1884 – 1886

Pope Leo XIII was saying his Mass in his private chapel in presence of some cardinals. At the end of the Mass as he was ready to return to Sacristy, he stopped and stood in a trance white as snow. As he recovered his spirit he went to his office and Continue reading

Fr. Peter Carota Memorial Page

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We have opened another Facebook page in honor of Fr. Peter Carota.

Fr. Carota passed away this morning (July 8, 2016). We have set this memorial page to allow people to relive their fond memories of this holy priest! Please feel free to post any photos and comments on the Facebook page. You may also continue to post on this website as well.

Let us offer many Masses for Fr. Carota. May he rest in peace.

https://www.facebook.com/frpetercarota/

From the Desk of Canon Olivier Meney, ICRSS

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A  brief explanation of some aspects of the Mass in its Extraordinary Form

  Melchisedech

The Prayer “Supra quae” refers to Melchisedech (page 37, red booklet). Who was this strange character? Where does he come from? Why is he mentioned here at the heart of the Canon of the Mass?

We find mentioned for the first time of this mysterious figure in the book of Genesis 14:17. He is the king of Salem, the High Priest. He is Melchisedech who offered bread and wine as a sacrifice. The Fathers of the Church recognized in Him as a Continue reading

From the Desk of Canon Olivier Meney, ICRSS

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The following question has been asked to several priests around the world:

 

What part of the Mass, words or rubrics, in its extraordinary form moves you the best?

Father Louis, OSB: the words uttered by the priest: He took bread into His Holy and venerable hands (page 35 in red booklet). My hands are neither holy nor venerable! They are the ones of a poor sinner. The Liturgy however invites me to take great care of this fragile Host and my hands are not mine any more but the one of Jesus who takes me in His own. “My Lord, I am holding Thee, I do not want to let Thee go.”

Father Emmanuel Marie de Saint Jean: “I am always more and more touched by the self-effacement of the priest who disappears behind Christ. The more the presence of the Priest goes away, the more Christ grows.”

Canon Alban Denis, ICRSP. : “The continuity and permanency of the Liturgy. The priest is never alone celebrating. He is with the entire Church. He is with the cohort of all the priests who celebrated before him. I say Mass the exact same way as Saint John Bosco; I pronounce the same words as the Curé of Ars did; I make the same movement as Pius X and all others…. We will meet in Heaven. This is a great source of humility and stimulation. Far from feeling to be limited by rules and rubrics, the rubrics carry me in my daily celebration.”

Father Benedict Joseph: “The celebration ‘ad orientem’. The orientation of the priest toward the East expresses well the function of the priest as Pontiff. Being all turned together in the same direction, gives a vivid image of the unity of the militant Church walking towards Heaven. It is also a great help to avoid any kind of self-centeredness.

Father Laurent-Marie, Servant of Jesus and Marie: “this Liturgy expresses the ‘Mysterium Fidei’ in a particular good and proper way, with the sense of contemplation, recollection and reverence. Even in the celebration of the greatest feast of the year, with the use of multiple ministers, incense, polyphonic choirs and even orchestras, all leads to the great silence of the Canon and the Consecration. God always establishes his masterpieces in an eternal silence.”

Father Claude Barthe: “The prayer of the ‘Suscipe’: May this Sacrifice be brought to the Altar. That is the Roman Epiclesis. These words bring us up to Heaven.”

 

From the Desk of Canon Olivier Meney, ICRSS

 

CM 2A brief explanation of some aspects of the Mass in its Extraordinary Form

As soon as the words of the Consecration are pronounced, the priest, holding the host between his two first fingers, adores the Host making immediately a genuflection. Then, standing up, he raises the Host as high as possible to be seen by the faithful, keeping his eyes on it. He places the host again on the corporal and genuflects again. He does the same with the Chalice.

The Adoration of the Host after consecration is consistently attested since the Divine Institution of the Eucharist. We find very early interesting Greek icons representing  Jesus as an infant laying on the paten (gilded plate on which the Host is placed).

  The act of adoration itself takes various forms according to cultures and traditions. One might be standing, kneeling, seating, or prostrated on the floor: each one marks in its own way the same spiritual act of faith and adoration.

St. John Chrysostom attests that in Eastern Liturgy the “elevation of the host” came only just before communion and with great solemnity. The Holy Doors are finally opened, the curtains removed and the celebrant comes out (remember that the whole liturgy in this rite is out of sight) saying: “Consider the Table of the King. The King is here. If your vestments are pure, adore and receive communion.”

Since the 10th century, another sign of Adoration of God, is the addition of the ringing of the bells. We can read on the Carthusian rules the following ordinance: “Whenever the bell is rang for the consecration, wherever one is, he musts stop his activity and kneel down as long as the bells are rang.”

Yves de Chartres, Bishop of Paris (1115), gave thanks to Margaret, Queen of England for her gift of Bells for the Notre Dame Cathedral. He promised that her soul will be remembered at each consecration as they will ring.

The genuflection, done immediately after the words of the consecration are said, is a great act of faith on the power of the Instituted Words themselves. “This is my Body”: Adoration follows. Elevation comes after.

Another great addition of adoration in liturgy is the use of Torch-Bearer. Candles are sign of respect.

Since the heresy of Beranger – who denied the real presence of Jesus in the Eucharist- the use of particular signs of adoration have been encouraged to sustain our faith. All that can help us is good to have.

 

From the Desk of Canon Olivier Meney, ICRSS

CM 2A brief explanation of some aspects of the Mass in its Extraordinary Form
To acquire a ”notable liturgical formation and a deep, personal familiarity with the earlier form of the liturgical celebration” (Motu Proprio, Benedict XVI, July 2007) or an exploration into the theological, historical, devotional, liturgical, ritualistic, architectural, artistic, linguistic, practical, legalistic, mystical… aspects of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

Priest turning his back to the People? 

 It is a common remark heard about the Latin Mass. The distance expressed between the celebrant – getting himself behind a closed communion rail, setting himself up above everyone, not looking at the people; facing the altar – and the people remaining silent is striking. Why this has been the case for some 2000 years…?

Simply because the Mass is not considered as a social moment to which the faithful are invited to party at. It is foremost the renewal of the Single Act of Christ, offering Himself once and for all at the Last Supper, consummating His Sacrifice on the Cross, and  continuing the very same Act at each Mass. It is Christ celebrating Mass. Not any individual priest. The faithful are privileged  witnesses of it.

The position of the Priest is clearly not random. He and all the congregation are facing East. St John in the Book of Apocalypse  promised that Christ will come back like the rising Sun in all His Glory.

At Mass we all face “Oriens” that is East, waiting for our Divine Risen Master to come!

In the Roman style, many churches had “oculi” that were little windows kept opened behind the altar. Our very own St. Margaret Mary sanctuary is an example of this tradition. The purpose for this is to avoid missing the coming of Our Lord Jesus Christ if it would happen during the celebration of Mass.