Chaplain’s Corner | Palm Sunday – April 9, 2017

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Today the Church enters the most solemn week of her liturgical year. During Holy Week, we accompany Jesus Christ in His Passion and Death, which finally bear fruit in His most sacred Resurrection. We are not mere bystanders at these events, but they enter into our souls to the extent that we open ourselves to them.

The Sacred Liturgy is our teacher in the spirituality of Holy Week. On Palm Sunday, we welcome with joy into our hearts Jesus Christ our King, so that we might be filled with the hope of entering one day into the New and Heavenly Jerusalem, following where our Head has gone before us.

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Help St. Francis de Sales Oratory become “America’s Most Beautiful Church”!

The Institute’s apostolate, St. Francis de Sales Oratory, recently made it to the finals of an interesting online contest titled “Church Madness 2017: National Churchpionship”, where it’s competing with St. James Church (Louisville, Kentucky) for the title of “America’s Most Beautiful Church”! The competition even got to be featured on this Fox TV segment. Click here to vote (voting ends on Thursday, April 6 at 11:59PM Central Time) and let’s help make St. Francis de Sales the Most Beautiful Church in America!

YouTube live feed of the Pontifical Mass with Cardinal Burke tomorrow (March 19, 2017)

We are currently experiencing technical glitches on YouTube, please visit this FB feed: https://www.facebook.com/TradicionalismoCatolico/videos/1823076367942267/

Tomorrow’s Pontifical Mass (Extraordinary Form) to be celebrated by Raymond Cardinal Burke at St. Margaret Mary will be available for viewing live via YouTube (click here). While mass starts at 12:30 PM (PST), the YouTube channel will start to broadcast sometime before mass. This will be shown as well at the Father Kozina Hall via overhead projector where additional seats will accommodate the expected big number of faithful attending. A priest will go down the hall to distribute Holy Communion. After mass (4PM), a welcome reception at the Cathedral of Christ the Light (2121 Harrison St, Oakland, CA 94612) will take place, concluding with a Solemn Benediction at 5PM. Feel free to check our main website (where the YouTube video will also be available as well).

EF Pontifical Mass with Cardinal Burke in Oakland, California, March 19 (Sunday) at 12:30PM

Update: Welcome reception will take place at the Cathedral of Christ the Light at 4PM, not at the St. Margaret Mary church yard as announced earlier; see updated info below.

A once in a lifetime event in the San Francisco Bay Area! His Eminence, Raymond Cardinal Burke, will be celebrating a Pontifical Mass in the Extraordinary Form at St. Margaret Mary (Oakland, CA) on March 19, 2017 at 12:30PM. There will be a welcome reception after mass (4PM) at Cathedral of Christ the Light (2121 Harrison St, Oakland, CA 94612) concluding with a Solemn Benediction at 5PM. Share the news and invite your friends!

Photos: Confirmation in the Extraordinary Form in San Francisco (Dec. 3, 2016)

Last Saturday (December 3, 2016), his Excellency, the Most Reverend Salvatore J. Cordileone, Archbishop of San Francisco conferred the sacrament of Confirmation to a group of mostly young Catholics from various parishes in the Archdiocese of San Francisco. The rite of Confirmation was done in the Extraordinary Form, which was followed by a Solemn Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament at Star of the Sea Church in San Francisco. To our knowledge, this marks the first time the Sacrament of Confirmation was done in the archdiocese using the traditional Roman Rite since the post-Conciliar liturgical reform of the 60’s. Liturgical assistance was provided by some seminarians from the nearby St. Patrick’s Seminary and University at Menlo Park. Here are a few photos of the Confirmation ceremony (click here to view the rest on our smugmug photo gallery).

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Guest post: Understanding When to Kneel, Sit, and Stand at the Traditional Latin Mass (revised 2nd edition)

Since the publication of the first edition of this essay online by California Latin Mass in 2013, and subsequent postings by other blogs such as the Traditional Latin Mass Society of San Francisco, Canons Regular of the New Jerusalem, and most recently Rorate-Caeli, readers have expressed to me not only their appreciation for what they’ve learned, but also to point out unintended typos and errors in the text and in the order of postures in the tables. I have corrected those typos and errors in this revised edition.

I have also added a new section discussing the posture at Orate Fratres, which I believe deserves more than just a passing mention and a footnote. The impetus for this was the change in the mandated posture at Orate Fratres in the Novus Ordo.

Up until 2010, the common posture for all Roman rite Catholics, whether assisting in the Novus Ordo or in the Traditional Latin Mass, was to remain seated while the priest says Orate, fratres, recite the response while seated, and then only rise afterwards. The English text of the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (Novus Ordo, of course), revised and approved for U.S. and Canadian dioceses in 2012, now instructs the faithful assisting in the Novus Ordo to rise for this prayer and recite the response standing. The word fratres could now also be properly rendered as “Brothers and sisters” in lieu of “brethren.” I would advise anyone inclined to think that this is just more evidence of the propensity in the Novus Ordo to innovate unnecessarily and that it has nothing to do with the Traditional Latin Mass to withhold your judgment and read section VI first. There is more to this than you think.

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Chaplain’s Corner | Last Sunday after Pentecost (November 20, 2016)

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On this final Sunday of the liturgical year, the Church turns her mind and heart to the contemplation of the end of the world. Here she accepts the teaching of Jesus that the world as we know it is passing away, that here we have no lasting city, but seek a home that is yet to come. She confesses her faith in the Last One, Who is the Lord of the Last Things, Who will come again to our earth.

At His Second Coming, our traditional Gospel today teaches us, the Lord will come openly and in glory, with the sign of His Cross in the sky for all to behold. He will come again not in the weakness and poverty of His Sacred Nativity in the manger of Bethlehem, but in the regal victory of His Resurrection and Ascension. He will come not to save us – He has done that already – but to judge us, consummating His beautiful work of salvation. In His First Coming, He came to sow; at the end of time, He comes to gather.

We have a tendency to fear the Second Coming of Jesus. For one, we know our sinfulness and how unworthy in ourselves we are of His Mercy. For another, we are attached to the pleasures of this life and wish not to lose them. The conquering of these fears is the blessed work of Jesus’s coming into our hearts by grace, which applies to us the salvation He won for us in His First Coming, so that we can be eager for His Second Coming.

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UPDATE: Schedule of Traditional Latin Masses (as of 11/19/2016) in the Metropolitan Ecclesiastical Province of San Francisco and beyond

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We’ve recently updated the schedule of Traditional Latin Masses in The Metropolitan Ecclesiastical Province of San Francisco, which can be viewed or downloaded on this link. We strive to provide as much updates as we can, so if you know of a place not listed here, please email us (tlmofsf@gmail.com) with the information. Thank you!

 

Chaplain’s Corner | October 23, 2016

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Beginning on October 31 with All Hallows’ Eve, the Church celebrates on November 1 the solemn feast of All Saints. In the month of November, the last month of the liturgical year, the Church turns her gaze to the Last Things. She delights to begin this annual month-long meditation with the superabundant glory of the feast of all the sanctity that has been communicated to angels and men.

The feast of All Saints is deeply encouraging. It teaches us that holiness is for everyone, in every state and walk of life. Contemplating all the saints, we are encouraged to learn that heroic virtue and perfect divine love are possible for us in the concrete details of our lives. We discover with joy that there are pope saints, bishop saints, priest saints, deacon saints, religious saints, married saints, widow saints, single saints; there are children saints, elderly saints, penitent saints, royal saints, wealthy saints, poor saints; there are saints of every temperament, occupation, race, language, land, nation, and time. Our celebration is a veritable symphony of sanctity!

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