Breaking news: Shrine of Christ the King to be stabilized. Archdiocese Deeds Building and Property to the Institute!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SHRINE OF CHRIST THE KING TO BE STABILIZED [View Press Release]

Archdiocese Deeds Building and Property to the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest

CHICAGO, IL (February 28, 2016) – The Archdiocese of Chicago today announced that it has deeded the Shrine of Christ the King in Woodlawn and the land on which it stands to the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest. The members of the apostolic institute have confirmed that they have received sufficient funds for the immediate stabilization of the historic Shrine building, ravaged by fire in October, 2015, and determined to be in hazardous condition. The Institute has committed itself to promptly remedying the dangerous condition created by the fire and then following through with the full restoration of the building.

“We express our deep gratitude to all the individuals and organizations whose most generous and timely donations helped bring us to this moment. We are mindful of the dangerous condition of the Shrine and will begin stabilization immediately with funds already collected,” said Reverend Canon Matthew L. Talarico, Provincial Superior for the Institute in the United States. “We are grateful to the Archdiocese for its partnership throughout our ministry in Woodlawn, especially during this difficult time. Since the day of the fire the collaboration with the Archdiocese has been remarkable: frequent communication, hard work and prayer.”

In thanksgiving for this agreement and in celebration of God’s blessings, the Institute has invited the public to a festive Mass on March 19, the Feast of St. Joseph, at 10:00am in the Shrine’s current Mass location, the gymnasium of First Presbyterian church (6400 S. Kimbark Ave.). Afterwards, all are welcome for a St. Joseph Table luncheon reception with refreshments at 12:00 noon in the church hall of the same building. For more information on this event, contact: Rev. Canon Matthew Talarico at 773-363-7409, ext. 4, or at canon.talarico@institute-christ-king.org.

The Archdiocese of Chicago is supportive of the Institute’s efforts to maintain its presence in the Woodlawn community and continue its ministry there. The Archdiocese wishes the Institute every success.

Chaplain’s Corner | 3rd Sunday of Lent (February 28, 2016)

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​One of the true joys of the Season of Lent is the common following of the Stations of the Cross. There is hardly a parish that doesn’t have a Friday night devotion of this type during Lent!

The Way of the Cross is a privileged way of entering into the Passion and Death of Our Lord. The Church attaches a plenary indulgence to it whenever it is made by moving from station to station at duly erected Stations. The Franciscans are charged with “duly erecting” the Stations throughout the Church because of their custody of the Holy Land and because St. Francis of Assisi invented the devotion. In the sacristy of every church is a “Decretum Erectionis” signed by a Franciscan for the Stations in that church. Thus, the Stations take us on pilgrimage to the Holy Land and into the heart of St. Francis.

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Photos: 2016 Rite of Institution of Lectors and Acolytes at St. Patrick’s (Menlo Park, CA)

We were recently invited to the Rite of Institution of Lectors and Acolytes by some friends of ours at St. Patrick’s Seminary in Menlo Park, CA. The main celebrant of the Holy Mass (in the Ordinary Form) was the Most Reverend Robert F. Vasa, D.D., Bishop of Santa Rosa. We join the family and friends of the instituted lectors and acolytes in congratulating them all, and we ask our readers to keep them in your prayers as they continue their vocation discernment process. Below are a few photos taken from this special event. More photos can be viewed at our smugmug gallery website.

Chaplain’s Corner | February 21, 2016

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​Why does the Church place before us the Lord’s Transfiguration on the Second Sunday of Lent? St. Thomas Aquinas: “Now in order that anyone go straight along a road, he must have some knowledge of the end: thus an archer will not shoot the arrow straight unless he first see the target…Above all is this necessary when hard and rough is the road, heavy the going, but delightful the end.”

We are on the hard, rough road of Lent – of the Cross – and we are headed towards the delightful end of Easter – of the Resurrection. We need this encouragement from Jesus to keep our eye on the prize of glorious resurrection in order that we may faithfully suffer and die with Him.

The Transfiguration is a preview of the Resurrection for the disciples and for us. During Lent, our Lord is asking us to go out into the desert with Him. He is asking us to suffer with Him and eventually to die with Him. By giving us this preview of His glory and ours today, He wishes to reassure us that suffering and death are not the final word of our story with Him. He wishes to encourage our hearts with the truth of the future glory of Heaven to which we are called. And so today He shows us His Resurrection.

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The Chaplain’s Corner | “A Brief Explanation of Some Aspects of the Mass in its Extraordinary Form Series” #5

imageA brief explanation of some aspects of the Mass in its Extraordinary Form (5)

To acquire a ”notable liturgical formation and a deep, personal familiarity with the earlier form of the liturgical celebration” (Motu Proprio, Benedict XVI, July 2007) or an exploration into the theological, historical, devotional, liturgical, ritualistic, architectural, artistic, linguistic, practical, legalistic, mystical… aspects of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

The Altar

 The altar is the table of sacrifice. The place where the victim is to be slain. In the case of the Eucharist, the Altar stands at the same time for three different realities. The table of the Last Supper, around which the disciples gathered; the place where Christ died; and  Christ Himself. Indeed, Christ is at the same time, the Altar, the Victim and the Priest offering the Sacrifice.

Each altar can be considered as an extension of the very same table used at the Last Supper. It is the very same Cross on which Jesus is crucified. It is Jesus Christ offering Himself to His Father.

It is a table: a Divine Meal is offered to which we are all, vested with the nuptial garment, invited to share.

It is a place where The Sacrifice is made—the very same Place. Traditionally sited on three steps representing the Calvary, adorned with Candles representing His Mother, Saint John the Baptist, the Angels… dressed with altar cloths representing the Shroud…

It is Christ Himself. The same Victim is actually offered. The five Crosses engraved in the Altar Stone are    Jesus’ wounds. That is the reason why any time before turning around, the priest kisses the altar. Indeed doing so, he kisses Christ Himself from whom alone comes any blessing: Dominus vobiscum.

The Passion starts at the Last Super with St. John’s embrace, laying on Christ’s side… and with the betraying kiss of Judas in the Garden.

How do we attend the Sacrifice of Mass? What kind of kiss do we offer Our Lord?

Next Week:  40 Hours Devotions: Mass celebrated in the front of the Blessed Sacrament

 

A Lenten Reflection | Poor in Spirit

Poor-in-SpiritI was standing in line today at the 15 items or less checkout stand.  It was really a trying day for me, but I didn’t expect any less because this is Lent and what’s that saying?, “if anything can go wrong…?”

The person in front of me had way more than 15 items.  She was an elderly woman. She was moving very slowly in putting her items on the register. On top of that she wrote a check. I thought who uses checks now a days?  My head was about to explode because I was in a hurry, a hurry to do this and Continue reading

The Chaplain’s Corner |”Invocabit Sunday”

img_0334Today is “Invocabit Sunday,” the solemn beginning of the Holy Season of Quadragesima. This Sunday ranks with Passion and Palm Sundays, such that in the Roman Church no feast day ever takes its place. Thus, at Rome and wherever else the Chair of Peter is celebrated as a 1st Class feast, its solemnity is kept tomorrow. As we begin Holy Lent, the Church places before our hearts the dramatic events of the Temptation of Our Lord. Here we learn the meaning of our holy season and its essential character as profound union with Christ: we go to the desert to fast with Jesus during Lent because we want to be wherever He is. We are in Love with Him and so we go wherever He goes. Our Love makes us willing to suffer and to die with Him so that we may rise with Continue reading

The Chaplain’s Corner | “A Brief Explanation of Some Aspects of the Mass in its Extraordinary Form Series” #4

imageA brief explanation of some aspects of the Mass in its Extraordinary Form (4)

To acquire a ”notable liturgical formation and a deep, personal familiarity with the earlier form of the liturgical  celebration” (Motu Proprio, Benedict XVI, July 2007) or an exploration into the theological, historical, devotional, liturgical, ritualistic, architectural, artistic, linguistic, practical, legalistic, mystical… aspects of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

What is the Structure of the Mass?

The Preparation: Mass starts indeed with a spiritual awaking. None can approach the divine Mystery that is to be celebrated without a  sufficient conditioning time of prayers. The rule of fasting (today’s rule is as little as one hour before communion), of a proper attire (church clothes, too often forgotten), sacred silence in church… the vesting prayers of the priest, the sign of the cross with holy water as we enter into the church, or- the aspersion of the same water by the priest on Sunday, the prayers at the foot of the Altar and its confession of sin through the Confiteor and the received absolution contribute to this preparation. (page 10-16 in red missalette)

The Teaching: It is part of Continue reading

Lenten Reflection | On Charity

As we begin to move into Lent, I think about what I can to improve myself in the eyes of Christ. What do I need to work on? I thought about my day and thought about what “I could have done.” The thought of charity came to my mind. How charitable was I to my fellow brothers and sisters? It’s easy to be nice and courteous to those whom I like or want to be nice too. But then I thought, “Where is the merit in that?!” Anybody can do that. Charity, like many other noble virtues require a self-immolation or dying to oneself. We must give till it hurts–hurt enough. To die on the cross with Christ for the love of Christ. I must put this into practice when encountering people whom I do not get along with. I must exercise charity in thought, word and actions.  It’s not always easy, but then Jesus dying on the cross for us want easy either, was it?

 

Thomas Dinh

Guest Writer