Photos: Confirmation in the Extraordinary Form in San Francisco (Dec. 3, 2016)

Last Saturday (December 3, 2016), his Excellency, the Most Reverend Salvatore J. Cordileone, Archbishop of San Francisco conferred the sacrament of Confirmation to a group of mostly young Catholics from various parishes in the Archdiocese of San Francisco. The rite of Confirmation was done in the Extraordinary Form, which was followed by a Solemn Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament at Star of the Sea Church in San Francisco. To our knowledge, this marks the first time the Sacrament of Confirmation was done in the archdiocese using the traditional Roman Rite since the post-Conciliar liturgical reform of the 60’s. Liturgical assistance was provided by some seminarians from the nearby St. Patrick’s Seminary and University at Menlo Park. Here are a few photos of the Confirmation ceremony (click here to view the rest on our smugmug photo gallery).

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Guest post: Understanding When to Kneel, Sit, and Stand at the Traditional Latin Mass (revised 2nd edition)

Since the publication of the first edition of this essay online by California Latin Mass in 2013, and subsequent postings by other blogs such as the Traditional Latin Mass Society of San Francisco, Canons Regular of the New Jerusalem, and most recently Rorate-Caeli, readers have expressed to me not only their appreciation for what they’ve learned, but also to point out unintended typos and errors in the text and in the order of postures in the tables. I have corrected those typos and errors in this revised edition.

I have also added a new section discussing the posture at Orate Fratres, which I believe deserves more than just a passing mention and a footnote. The impetus for this was the change in the mandated posture at Orate Fratres in the Novus Ordo.

Up until 2010, the common posture for all Roman rite Catholics, whether assisting in the Novus Ordo or in the Traditional Latin Mass, was to remain seated while the priest says Orate, fratres, recite the response while seated, and then only rise afterwards. The English text of the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (Novus Ordo, of course), revised and approved for U.S. and Canadian dioceses in 2012, now instructs the faithful assisting in the Novus Ordo to rise for this prayer and recite the response standing. The word fratres could now also be properly rendered as “Brothers and sisters” in lieu of “brethren.” I would advise anyone inclined to think that this is just more evidence of the propensity in the Novus Ordo to innovate unnecessarily and that it has nothing to do with the Traditional Latin Mass to withhold your judgment and read section VI first. There is more to this than you think.

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Chaplain’s Corner | Last Sunday after Pentecost (November 20, 2016)

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On this final Sunday of the liturgical year, the Church turns her mind and heart to the contemplation of the end of the world. Here she accepts the teaching of Jesus that the world as we know it is passing away, that here we have no lasting city, but seek a home that is yet to come. She confesses her faith in the Last One, Who is the Lord of the Last Things, Who will come again to our earth.

At His Second Coming, our traditional Gospel today teaches us, the Lord will come openly and in glory, with the sign of His Cross in the sky for all to behold. He will come again not in the weakness and poverty of His Sacred Nativity in the manger of Bethlehem, but in the regal victory of His Resurrection and Ascension. He will come not to save us – He has done that already – but to judge us, consummating His beautiful work of salvation. In His First Coming, He came to sow; at the end of time, He comes to gather.

We have a tendency to fear the Second Coming of Jesus. For one, we know our sinfulness and how unworthy in ourselves we are of His Mercy. For another, we are attached to the pleasures of this life and wish not to lose them. The conquering of these fears is the blessed work of Jesus’s coming into our hearts by grace, which applies to us the salvation He won for us in His First Coming, so that we can be eager for His Second Coming.

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UPDATE: Schedule of Traditional Latin Masses (as of 11/19/2016) in the Metropolitan Ecclesiastical Province of San Francisco and beyond

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We’ve recently updated the schedule of Traditional Latin Masses in The Metropolitan Ecclesiastical Province of San Francisco, which can be viewed or downloaded on this link. We strive to provide as much updates as we can, so if you know of a place not listed here, please email us (tlmofsf@gmail.com) with the information. Thank you!

 

Chaplain’s Corner | October 23, 2016

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Beginning on October 31 with All Hallows’ Eve, the Church celebrates on November 1 the solemn feast of All Saints. In the month of November, the last month of the liturgical year, the Church turns her gaze to the Last Things. She delights to begin this annual month-long meditation with the superabundant glory of the feast of all the sanctity that has been communicated to angels and men.

The feast of All Saints is deeply encouraging. It teaches us that holiness is for everyone, in every state and walk of life. Contemplating all the saints, we are encouraged to learn that heroic virtue and perfect divine love are possible for us in the concrete details of our lives. We discover with joy that there are pope saints, bishop saints, priest saints, deacon saints, religious saints, married saints, widow saints, single saints; there are children saints, elderly saints, penitent saints, royal saints, wealthy saints, poor saints; there are saints of every temperament, occupation, race, language, land, nation, and time. Our celebration is a veritable symphony of sanctity!

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Full HD video: Inaugural Solemn High Mass at St. Joseph Oratory in Detroit, MI

We are pleased to share with you the full-length HD video of last Sunday’s Inaugural Solemn High Mass of the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest at St. Joseph Oratory in Detroit, MI. Photos of this special event will be posted shortly.

From the Desk of Canon Olivier Meney, ICRSS

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Picture: Mgsr. Gilles Wach during the Domine Non Sum Dignus

On the Domine Non Sum Dignus

The rite of communion includes a two fold ceremony. The communion of the priest solemnly precedes the one of the faithful. The reason could be just caused by the fact that the priest might have no people assisting at his Mass, but this does not seem to be the real reason. Priests indeed are only allowed to say private Masses without an altar server since a very recent time.

The motive of the double rite of communion is Continue reading

From the Desk of Canon Olivier Meney, ICRSS

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The 7 Steps of Ordination

Part V:   The Ordination of Priests,  continued

After the laying on of hands and the consecratory preface, the Bishop vests the newly ordained priest in the vestments of the priesthood.  At the beginning of the ceremony, the candidate wears the stole over the left shoulder (as do all other deacons).  The Bishop places the stole around the right shoulder and crosses it in front.  The crossed stole symbolizes the state of obedience of the priest under the bishop.  The priest then receives the chasuble, with the back of the vestment folded, while the bishop says, “Take the vestment of the priesthood which signifies Continue reading

Chaplain’s Corner – Beheading of John the Baptist (August 28, 2016)

On August 29 the Church celebrates the Beheading of John the Baptist. This is a most poignant feast for our time, in which God’s law concerning marriage is so often broken and ignored. St. John the Baptist was martyred for defending God’s law concerning marriage and this makes him a great example and help to all in our time who undertake the same joyful task.

The story of John’s beheading begins with the sinful and invalid marriage of Herod the Tetrarch with Herodias, the lawful wife of Herod’s brother, Philip. Herod had divorced his own wife, whose name was Phasaelis. Herod, therefore, had committed adultery in entering into “marriage” with Herodias; neither he nor Herodias were free to marry. How many Catholics and non-Catholics in our time have committed this same sin and live in this same situation!
John the Baptist is the biblical model for how the Church responds pastorally – with true love – to persons who contradict Jesus’s teaching that “whoever divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery.” Herod was quite fond of John and loved to hear him preach, more out of curiosity and admiration than out of a desire for the truth. John did not let this friendship with Herod compromise his love for God and so he told Herod and Herodias the plain truth of their situation: they were living in adultery and they had to separate if they wanted to stop offending God and avoid eternal damnation.
Herod was perplexed by John’s teaching because he was a weak man. We might imagine he was the kind of person who knows what the right thing is but lacks the moral courage to carry it out. Herodias, on the other hand, was full of malice and hated John. She wanted him dead because of his call to repentance. She saw him as the enemy of all her desires, especially for the power that comes with being the legal wife of the tetrarch. In her hatred for John, she prevailed upon Herod to imprison him.